Behind the Sports Desk: My First Experience Casting Rocket Royale!

June 1, 2016 | By Mason Dunlap | GAMING

It’s not as though I have any particular sort of trouble speaking in front of a camera and microphone while live streaming. I’m actually fairly comfortable doing so after a number of years making YouTube videos and recently moving over to Twitch.

But I was really nervous about casting Rocket Royale this past weekend.

Like, only managed to sleep 4 hours before the broadcast nervous.

Watch live video from RocketLeagueCentral on www.twitch.tv

All-around awesome guy Blake “CloudFuel” Tull (Owner of Rocket League Central & Twitch Esports Program Associate) formally invited me to co-cast Rocket League Central’s Rocket Royale tournament after we’d been casually kicking around the idea for a really, really long time. I was ecstatic; I’d get to cast a Rocket League tournament (something I’ve been itching to do), and I’d get to do so alongside my buddy James “Jamesbot” Villar no less! I look up to the whole RLC crew – it’s a team full of incredibly talented and passionate Rocket League community members; so passionate, in fact, that several of them were also tapped by Twitch to officially cast the first ever Rocket League Championship Series. That’s no small thing!

Behind the Scenes at Rocket Royale

Through this experience, I was lucky enough to get a behind-the-scenes look at how RLC conducts their Rocket Royale tournament, and while it was only just a small part of what they do as a whole, I was blown away by what this group of community members manages to accomplish. So many people were working in sync to ensure everything was running smoothly and on time. I actually felt a little guilty that so much work was taken care of for me to the point that all I needed to really do was focus on the game itself and commentating!

I had the RLC team’s full support. I could brush aside my nerves and just think about what was before me… which was upwards of 2,000 people on the internet who I’ve never spoken to before.

Well, at least if I made a mistake, nobody on the internet would judge me harshly for it. That never happens, right? So me accidentally spawning in on Orange Team at the beginning of Game 7 of the Grand Finals was no big deal at all. It was not the most mortifying mistake of my adult life. Not mortified. At all. (Luckily, I bailed out before the game started)

I was thoroughly impressed by how much RLC does to organize tournaments like Rocket Royale for the community. For me, this is just reaffirmation that Rocket League is an incredible game that inspires people to work incredibly hard for their own sake and the sake of their fellow gamers. And now, with the Rocket League Championship Series, we see these same people continue to do this in the hopes of reaching people who have never experienced its awesomeness firsthand. I strongly encourage you to show them your support in whatever way you see fit.

Whoops

Thanks Rocket Royale!

A big thank you once again the whole crew at RLC. Rocket League has been a part of my daily life since I picked it up for free on the PlayStation store, and I haven’t put it down since. So, casting Rocket Royale was as seriously awesome experience, and I am grateful for it. Be sure to check out the VOD on Twitch.tv/RocketLeagueCentral; don’t forget to leave a Follow while you’re over there!

Also, be sure to let us know if you’d like to see NZXT and RLC collaborate on more things in the future. We’d love to hear from you guys, since you’re the ones who matter most to both of us. </sappiness>

As a reminder, be sure to check out NZXT.com/RocketLeague for special giveaways, tutorials, and more articles like this one! Follow NZXT and myself on Twitch for Rocket League streams. Until next time, I’ve been Mason, and I’ll see you in the pitch!

 

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Mason Dunlap

Mason Dunlap

Mason “MasonRL90” is a Social Media Specialist, Rocket League Ops, and Influencer Program Manager at NZXT. His goal is to grow the Rocket League community through great content and personal involvement in the scene.